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20121215
20121215
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
san francisco one of the best baseball towns -- no, the best baseball town in america. [cheers and applause] let us now welcome and please show your love and enthusiasm the mayor of city and county of san francisco the honorable edwin lee. former mayor and current lieutenant governor the honorable gavin newsom. the city chief of protocol charlotte schultz, and her husband former secretary of state george schultz. former mayor willie brown. [cheers and applause] and former mayor frank jordan. we want to acknowledge the husband of united states senator and former mayor dianne feinstein, mr. richard bloom. the wife of former mayor gina mos coney and the wife of former mayor joe alliteo, catherine. the sister of former mayor george christopher. the board board and the rest of the city family who has made this event possible. we are also honored to be joined by several giants dignitaries. president and ceo larry baer and his wife sam. [cheers and applause] . giants vice president and general manager brian saibian and his wife amanda. [cheers and applause] the wife of the skip
be here that we decided this weekend to also require the americas cup to celebrate -- to require the san francisco giants to have a play off game, the 49ers to play this weekend, the blue grass festival to be here, the parade, as well as the castro sea fair to coincide and welcome you in style. but i wanted to say a few words about the one thing that keeps me up as the head of the legislative body here in san francisco. the reason why i sit with many of our first responders on our city's disaster council, the reason why a few years ago chief white and i led almost a half a billion dollar bond campaign to rebuild the water, fire, and police infrastructure. about every six months i literally wake up in the middle of the night thinking about what would happen if a disaster struck our city. and i think about this and i think i have these nightmares really for three reasons. one, everyone who lives in san francisco knows that in 1906 we were hit not just by an earthquake, but by an earthquake that led to a fire that burned down literally every single neighborhood in the district that i curren
between walter reed and bethesda. america's army is an amazingly heroic army. they have occupied valley forge , tokyo, berlin, danang and now it occupies bethesda, maryland, but we're working through that. how do we break those cultural barriers, how do we figure out supporting supporters, how do we do that before the next capacity goes on? so what have we done, what capabilities do we bring, where do we use them and how will they be playing a role here in the event of the most likely nightmare scenarios for this area? i grew up in the bay area, i have tremendous affection for it. i did train on the east coast but i grew up in santa clara and in napa, i used to come down and watch candlestick park, my dad would bring me down, i would watch the 49ers play and i have great pride in the amount of collaboration and cooperation you are showing to figure out what the next nightmare scenario might be and be ready for it. it's probably going to be either an earthquake, it may be a man-made catastrophe such as an heinous terrorist act that could range anywhere from a mass casualty with chem-b
increased our rates to among the highest in america. but not nearly as much as if we hadn't passed a one-cent sales tax dedicated to water and sewer infrastructure. hunter: that sales tax counts for about a third of the revenue of the department right now. franklin: we got 75% of the voters to agree to tax themselves so that their children and their children's children could have clean water because we're investing in it now. hunter: there were no alternatives. the infrastructure was in dire straits. a lot of people didn't want to believe it had to be done, but it had to be done. what came out of those lawsuits by the upper chattahoochee river keeper were two consent decrees, focused on overflows. the intent is, city of atlanta, you need to keep the flows in the pipe. narrator: with the help of the funding the city raised, atlanta has been implementing an asset management plan that evaluates and addresses their infrastructure issues. hunter: it's a continuum. at one end, you have your regular maintenance that you do every day on the system, and at the other end, long-term planning so tha
across america, cities and towns, homes and businesses all depend upon one basic resource. modern civilization and life itself would be impossible without it. woman: okay, so today, we're going to look at how do we get our water? narrator: and today, it's a matter of simply turning on the tap. so often, we forget about the value of water. water is a commodity that is essential to life. 100 years ago, it would have been hard to imagine turning on the tap water. and now, it's an expectation. narrator: over 300 million people live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're finished with it. man: the water infrastructure is vital for disease protection, fire protection, basic sanitation, economic development, and for our quality of life. man: you just can't visualize all the assets th
're both cornerstones for the water issues that we face in america today. allbee: the clean water act set a floor and basically said, "everybody's who's discharging "is going to have to have a permit, and to achieve this defined performance level." narrator: the clean water act regulates the discharge of pollutants into surface waters across the nation. it protects our watersheds, our recreational waters, and our drinking water intakes. man: today, more than 50% of the nation's waters are fishable, swimmable. that's almost doubled since the clean water act was passed in '72. narrator: another significant component of the clean water act was a federally funded grant program to build wastewater treatment plants to reduce pollution in the waterways. and many cities built their treatment plants with this grant money. oberstar: but even a decade after it was enacted, the reagan administration came in and cut the grant program to a loan program. and funding diminished over a period of time. now, we still have 1/3 or more of the nation's streams and lakes that don't meet the standards of the cle
in all over north america and europe and africa and really we have got wishes coming in from almost every country in the world now. and people are just expressing, all kinds of amazing hopes and dreams for the future of the world which is really encouraging for us. we create the tree as a symbol of the global unity and hope. and we are going to continue to add wishes to the tree all through the month of december. so we would love for you to go to our website which is rainbow fund.org and it is free and we will printout your wish on a piece of paper and fold it into a crane and put it up on the tree. now, i want to thank, some key people who helped with this year's tree. first i want to start off with our core team, our core creative team and that consists of karin kai and linda mihara and thank you they have been working on the tree for seven years. >> and this year we have the help of dozens of volunteers and i want to particularly acknowledge the university of berkeley alfa, fi omega service community and volunteers from one brick. aid for good, the san francisco chapter. and you guys a
recently named your park the number one park system in the entire united states of america. [ applause ] >> we were also just named as a finalist to host this cool international parks conference in 2015 in which we are going to be welcoming cities from all over the country to learn how we do it here in san francisco. and then, just last month, and a big thank you to all of you, san francisco voters approved proposition b. the cleanest safe neighborhood parks fund which allows us to renovate and juvinate your parks. 83 years ago, uncle john mcclarin and if you go in the gm office you can see a picture of him. started the tradition of lighting this mile-long stretch of trees started and ending here in front of the lodge where he lived for a number of years. so this, this is san francisco official holiday tree right behind us, uncle john's tree. it is a cyrus that is more than 100 years old closer to 130 years old and tonight it sports over 550 christmas holiday lights. >> so i really want to give a big shout out to the rec and parks staff that has continued the tradition and i want to th
as a navy. as you see here, chile is located in the southwest coast of south america and we had an earthquake on february 27, 2010, with an intensity of 8.8 richter scale located approximately in the center of the country. the subduction zone, the area where the plate and the south american plate made contact was 250 kilometers. that means that the intensity was felt above 8 in about one-third of the country. as you can see, in the highlight color you can see the people who was affected with that earthquake at about 6 million people. that means more than 40 percent of the chilean population. in terms of energy was released, you can see there it's one trillion kilograms of tnt, that means an 8.8 earthquake. another comparison could be 18,000 times the hiroshima atomic bomb. it's supposed it occur less than two a year above 8. chili has first runner up with 9.5 with bolivia, 10 minutes duration. this one was 8.8, at that moment was no. 4, then japan next year led next year with 8.9, but it's a lot, a big amount of energy was released in just 3 1/2 minutes. usually that thing
their money to the camen islands and not in america and having huge threats and medicaid and medicare and threaten the scpeerns that is violence. number one and must commit ourselves to the ban on assault weapons. we lost about 6,000 americans in iraq in 10 years. lose 30 to 50,000 a home at home. 100,000 are injured and didn't die and the highest cost in any city is the emergency room hospitals in those cities where they're shot. [inaudible] shot by ak47's. we have a lot of role in the killing of syria. 9/11 /12 in benghazi. [inaudible] yards away. we must revive the ban on these adult suspects. i don't want to. >> >> >> deemphasize the drug culture and americans and so we have this crisis mr. mayor of plants closing when the cheap labor markets, jobs leaving, drugs and guns coming. that requires a national effort by all of us. while i reach out to you in san francisco those that hear my voice please stop the killing. please stop drug flow. please give peace a chance. in this instance means that labor unions, trade unions must open up and provide more training so they can la
need and we calculated it out. really in the world of corporate america, not that much. in the world of government, even less. and he said, yeah, we can do that. let me make some phone calls. a couple of days later, he said, all right, i got a couple commitments. let's put a team together. it was myself, diana, lewis, val valesky, i'm sorry, it's been a long week already and some people from public works. we want a couple engineers, i'm an old medic, diana is really the logistics master and i figure if we're going to go someplace where thins might go awry, i wanted someone like that. so we put this together in 30 days, including a holiday. we were wheels up for van, we spent 10 days in country. and the story there is interesting, to say the least. a little bit of a cultural difference. you kind of have to wade through, and i'm sure i'm preaching to the choir in the military here, you have to separate out how things are versus what you're used to and what it really means because otherwise you can really get into apples and oranges. so the take away for me, and what should be ro
. if you look at these pictures commerce is taking place under it where in america they would close down the block. this where my family has always had its stall. we got to make a living. what else can we do? we don't have any medical training which kind of -- okay, you are fire fighters, i figured you had some. that was my naivete at the moment, i think i was a little overwhelmed myself. that's still my on-going project as far as that goes, how can we raise some funds and i actually have a bunch of paramedics that would go over there in a heartbeat on their time if we could find a way to fund it to teach them the medicine. the reality is they don't have a health care system now. it's slowly coming back but it was wiped out. they had the tertiary care facility in the region. they were the closest thing to a trauma center. they were the closest thing to intensive care. when we were there, the nearest surgery was 400 kilometers away and they don't have helicopters, not so much. there's a few owned by the military. so it was a long ride. as a matter of fact, we thought about th
to build one of the greatest office buildings in america. that's more than a building. that's a living system. ♪ ♪ when san francisco first bought this land in 1999, it was home to a state office building. >> this was an old eight-story brown building the state owned and the workers' comp people were in that building. it was an old dee correctvth it building for decades. when i was a member of the board of supervisors, all of us wondered why we hadn't done anything there and the mayor thought the same. >> if an earthquake happened, the building was uninhabitable. it sat there vacant for quite a while. the city decided to buy the building in 1999 for $2. we worked and looked at ways that we can utilize the building for an office building. to build an icon i can building that will house a lot of city departments. >> the san francisco public utilities commission has an important job. we provide clean, pristine public drinking water to 2.6 million people in the san francisco bay area from the hetch hetchy regional water system. with also generate clean renewable energy for city service
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)